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  • 15 Sep 2021 8:43 AM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    READ HERE: GNH index.pdf


    New Zealand government recognises the benefit of reporting the GNH index.

    The Gross National Happiness.Today index developed by Stephanie Rossouw (Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand ) and Talita Greyling (University of Johannesburg, South Africa) uses Big Data in the form of Twitter to measure New Zealanders' evaluative mood. The scale of the happiness scores is between 0 (unhappy) and 10 (happy), with 5 being neutral, thus neither happy nor unhappy. Additionally, each tweet's underpinning emotions are analysed. Currently, a distinction is made between eight emotions: sadness, surprise, disgust, anticipation, fear, anger, trust, and joy.

    On Monday 6 September, Statistics New Zealand started reporting the GNH as an official indicator, representing a real-time measure for subjective well-being, in the NZ Statistic COVID-19 data portal.

     Please see the link below.

    https://www.stats.govt.nz/experimental/covid-19-data-portal?tab=Social&category=Life%20satisfaction&indicator=Gross%20national%20happiness

     

    Asked about the accuracy of the GNH, Stephanie said, "Once again, the GNH never ceases to amaze me The GNH captures the events of the past month accurately".

     

    9 August – negative impact of the major power cut experienced in the North Island

    17 August – level 4 lockdown for NZ

    30 August – Auckland to remain in level 4 lockdown for two more weeks starting 31 August

    3 September – lone terrorist attack in a Countdown grocery store

     


  • 11 Jul 2021 3:22 PM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)
    Congrats to the editorial team for our journal!

    @SpringerSocSci

    announced that the IF for Applied Research in Quality of Life is 3.078 – ranking 20/110 in Social Sciences, interdisciplinary (Q1)! #qualityoflife Learn more https://springer.com/journal/11482


  • 8 Jun 2021 11:40 AM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    Measuring Progress: Online Forum on Well-Being
    June 16, June 28, June 29

    Measuring Progress - Statistics Portal // Luxembourg - STATEC Research (public.lu)

    This international event will bring together leading thinkers to discuss the quest for better lives. Economists traditionally advocated economic growth as the foremost policy goal, but now even economists often challenge this view. How should we measure progress? The discussion remains open, indeed flourishes, with more contributors than ever.

    The event contributes broadly to this discussion. Preeminent authors from the well-being and quality-of-life fields will give six talks over three days. Talks will focus on their current research and include both the broader background and policy implications. At the end of each session, time will be reserved for questions and answers.

    SCHEDULE

    June 16, Wednesday: 17:00 CET, 11:00 AM Eastern
    Stefano Bartolini, University of Siena - Abstract
    Richard Easterlin, University of Southern California - Abstract
    Invitation and registration

    June 28, Monday: 17:00 CET, 11:00 AM Eastern
    Andrew Oswald, University of Warwick - Abstract
    Carol Graham, Brookings Institution and University of Maryland - Abstract
    Invitation and registration

    June 29, Tuesday: 17:00 CET, 11:00 AM Eastern
    Ruut Veenhoven, Erasmus University Rotterdam - Abstract
    John de Graaf, author, filmmaker, speaker - Abstract
    Invitation and registration

    REGISTRATION

    Please send an email to infoSWB2020@statec.etat.lu to indicate you are interested in attending. You will then be added to the event mailing list, which will be used to convey the most up to date information and registration links.

    MEASURING PROGRESS STATEC Seminar Series

    Beginning in September, STATEC Research will host a new seminar series continuing the discussions from the June event. Presentations will take place virtually approximately every two weeks. Talks will focus on quality-of-life research generally but will also discuss both the broader background and policy implications.

    QUESTIONS

    We will periodically update this page with additional details. You may also contact us here with questions: infoSWB2020@statec.etat.lu

    ORGANIZERS

    Measuring Progress: Online Forum on Well-Being is organized by STATEC Research, part of the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies of Luxembourg (STATEC), and supported by the International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies.

    Measuring Progress - Statistics Portal // Luxembourg - STATEC Research (public.lu)


  • 25 May 2021 12:17 PM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    The Centre for the Study of Living Standards (Canada) and The Productivity Institute (United Kingdom) are inviting proposals for papers on the topic “Productivity and Well-Being – Measurement and Explanations.” Accepted papers, which should represent new and original work, will be published in a theme issue of the International Productivity Monitor, now the joint flagship publication of both organizations. The expected publication date is the Spring of 2022. A virtual authors’ workshop with first drafts of papers will be held in November 2021. The deadline for receipt of proposals for papers is July 15, 2021. The call for paper providing the motivation for the project and the issues to be addressed is posted at http://www.csls.ca/call-for-papers.pdf

    If you have any questions, please contact Andrew Sharpe at andrew.sharpe@csls,ca

    Best Regards,

    Andrew Sharpe and Bart van Ark


  • 20 May 2021 9:10 AM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    Conferences/workshops

    The Doctoral School of Sociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Oradea, and Erasmus University Rotterdam invites you to participate on Thursday 27th May 2021 at 17.30 CET in the workshop World Database of Happiness: What it is and how to use

    Presenter: Prof. dr. Ruut Veenhoven, Emeritus professor of social conditions for human happiness, Erasmus University Rotterdam The workshop will be organized within the International Online Conference of Doctoral and Post-doctoral Students in Social Sciences, Oradea, 27-28th May 2021 (https://sites.google.com/view/conferintasds2021).

     

    To attend the workshop please register here:

    https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcvde6rqjwoGdUUEN0PZDvolNKsK9yXb38o.

    The number of places is limited!

     

    Sergiu Baltatescu

    Dr. habil., Professor of Sociology

    University of Oradea, Romania

    www.sergiubaltatescu.info

     


  • 9 May 2021 9:43 PM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    Policies for Better Lives:
    Strategies for life satisfaction and human wellbeing

    The McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP) is pleased to announce its 2021 annual conference “Policies for Better Lives: Strategies for life satisfaction and human wellbeing”. This on-line conference will take place in 2-hour sessions each Friday in May 2021 and features national and international expert panels, discussion and workshops. Panelists and participants are invited from research, policy and practitioner communities to share and discuss potential and current best practice in bringing evidence on life satisfaction to policy. Together they will evaluate bold candidate policy recommendations, assess their current feasibility, and identify key strategies for working across disciplines, jurisdictions and sectors to improve the experienced quality of life.  Please see the programme for the innovative structure of this sequence of discussions.  In addition, subjective wellbeing researchers in the ISQOLS community are invited to submit short policy proposal videos following the guidelines at https://wellbeing.research.mcgill.ca/BetterLives2021/submissions

    The Program and free registration are available at https://wellbeing.research.mcgill.ca/BetterLives2021

    Contact admincoord.ihsp@mcgill.ca or Chris.Barrington-Leigh@McGill.ca with any questions.



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  • 29 Apr 2021 11:08 AM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    Regional and Urban Resilience in a Turbulent World – Perspectives from Aotearoa New Zealand Satellite Session of the World Congress of the Regional Science Association International, Victoria University of Wellington, Friday 28 May 2021

    The analyses of global challenges such as the Covid-19 pandemic, climate change, poverty, polarisation and political instability often provide international or national perspectives, but the impacts can vary considerably across cities and regions as well.

    The Regional Science Association International (RSAI), founded in 1954, is an international community of scholars who focus on the regional impacts of national and global processes of economic and social change. The 2021 World Congress of RSAI is a virtual conference to be held online May 25-28, 2021 hosted by the Moroccan section of RSAI. New Zealand scholars will contribute by presenting 8 papers in the afternoon and evening of Friday, May 28. The New Zealand event will be hosted by Victoria University of Wellington at Rutherford House. Up to 30 people, including presenters, can attend in person (with afternoon tea, dinner and drinks included; and as long as Wellington is at Covid alert level 1 or 2). An unlimited number from elsewhere in New Zealand can attend online (see below). Overseas conference participants can attend online through the RSAI conference website.

    Programme, Friday, May 28th 2021 (speakers indicated by *)

    4.00-4.30 pm: Welcome and afternoon tea, Mezzanine Floor, Rutherford House 4.30-6.30 pm: Session 1, Room MZ02, Rutherford House Paul Dalziel*, Geography matters for small advanced economies: the implications for an economic strategy. Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy*, Gail Pacheco & Kade Sorensen, The effect of upzoning on house prices and redevelopment premiums in Auckland, New Zealand. Graham Squires*, Hai Hong Trinh, Don Webber & Arshad Javed, The connection of rental and house price affordability measures in New Zealand. William Cochrane, Jacques Poot* & Matthew Roskruge, Vulnerable people, local labour market resilience and global shocks: New Zealand evidence from the Covid-19 pandemic and the Global Financial Crisis.

    6.30-8.00 pm: Dinner at the Thistle Inn for in-person participants 8.00-10.00 pm: Session 2, Room MZ02, Rutherford House Ilan Noy*, How do pandemics affect economic growth? Lessons from the 1968 H3N2 influenza and 2003 SARS. Philip S. Morrison*, Stephanié Rossouw & Talita Greyling, The impact of exogenous shocks on wellbeing. New Zealanders’ reaction to Covid-19. Daniel Exeter*, An examination of the distributional implications of the Covid-19 pandemic. Arthur Grimes*, Regional patterns of wellbeing through pandemic lockdowns.

    10.00-11.00 pm: Drinks at the Thistle Inn In-person registration (first 30 to register): $190 (includes afternoon tea, dinner and drinks) Online NZ registration: $45 (live streamed and/or video accessible afterwards) These registration fees give access to the New Zealand paper presentations only.

    To register, go to https://pay.wgtn.ac.nz/RSAI21 Registration for the full virtual World Congress Conference (May 25-28, online only) can be via http://regionalscience.org/2021worldcongress/index.html For inquiries, contact either Philip.Morrison@vuw.ac.nz or Jacques.Poot@waikato.ac.nz Registration closes Friday, May 21th 202

    RSAI World Congress NZ Satellite Conference 28 May 2021.pdf

  • 19 Apr 2021 1:46 PM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Papers for the Vienna Yearbook of Population Research (VYPR) 2022 Special Issue on “Demographic aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences”

    Due to the ongoing impact of the Covid 19 pandemic on academic and daily lives, the submission deadline has been extended until 31 May 2021. This allows to also welcome submissions focusing on the most recent trends in the demographic impact of the pandemic.

    The VYPR is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal without any fees, which has been published annually by the Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences since 2003. It is addressing population trends as well as a broad range of theoretical and methodological issues in population research. The VYPR is indexed by SCOPUS, JSTOR, ROAD (Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources).

    Accepted papers will be published continuously online first. The printed volume with all contributions is scheduled for publication by end of 2022.

    Please find detailed information here: www.viennayearbook.org


  • 7 Apr 2021 4:40 PM | Jill Johnson (Administrator)

    APDU Workshop Series: Making the Best of the 2020 Census

    Virtual Workshop

    Town Halls: April 14 and May 12, 2021

    Trainings: June 16, August 18, and September 15, 2021

    Office Hours: Biweekly beginning June 9, 2021

    Price: Free

    Register Here

    Accurate statistics about 2020 will rely on much more than the decennial census data collection. Developing reliable data will require an understanding of challenges resulting from the pandemic, combined with greater use of non-traditional sources like administrative records. The solutions to these problems will impact how data is gathered going forward for a variety of purposes: education, housing, economic development, public health, and more.

    Register today for this series of town hall events and trainings. During this workshop series you will learn more about the quality of the data that state and local leaders rely on and how you can improve and supplement it.

    Town Hall #1: April 14, 2021 (3:00 – 4:00 PM ET)
    2020 Census was “Different” – A Rundown of Issues

    Facilitators:

    • Amy O’Hara, Research Professor, Massive Data Institute, Georgetown University
    • danah boyd, Principal Investigator, Microsoft Research & Founder, Data & Society

    With the COVID-19 pandemic, political interference, and disclosure avoidance concerns, this census was deeply impacted. Amy and danah will discuss what happened with the census, where we are now, what researchers are hearing from the Census Bureau, the updated timeline, and what the Census Bureau can still fix.

    Town Hall #2: May 12, 2021 (3:00 – 4:30 PM ET)
    Solving Data “Differences” – Assessing the Use Cases

    In this town hall, we will solicit your concerns and questions about upcoming census products – specifically about urban/rural, housing, workforce, health, and justice use cases. We will discuss data sources and methods for these different use cases. Since 2020 census products are delayed, we will discuss alternative data sources that may support population measurement.

    Training #1: June 16, 2021 (1:00 – 3:30 PM ET)
    Addressing the Census – Why Address Data is Crucial and How to Use It

    In the first of a series of trainings focused on preparing data users to use the 2020 census data, we will begin by familiarizing the group with types of address data to lead to a high-quality census enumeration, help to validate the census publications that come out, and potentially how to mount a Count Question Resolution challenge. In this session, we will review coverage and classification issues, how to evaluate data sources and tools to assess your data.

    Training #2: August 18, 2021 (1:00 – 3:30 PM ET)
    Age Bins – Where to Find More Data

    In our second training, we will discuss the importance of obtaining accurate data on different age categories. The Census Bureau has released demonstration data on their disclosure avoidance system; however, age bins have not been a component. Accurate age bins are critical for urban planning, public health, social research, and funding, and we know that the census has traditionally undercounted very young children and overcounted the elderly. We will discuss how possible imprecision in published census results may affect the age distribution and consider how age bins can be smoothed. We will also explore other datasets that can be used to understand key population subgroups.

    Training #3: September 15, 2021 (1:00 – 3:30 PM ET)
    Beyond COVID – Identifying Public Health Data to Prevent Disaster

    Whether it’s a global pandemic or an overdose crisis in your community, we want to empower you with the tools and resources to identify patterns and be prepared to respond. This training will go over the new administration’s Executive Order, which datasets can drive insights around health, highlighting differences between statistical and tactical data. We will also discuss measuring migration and service utilization. With these tools, we are hoping to prepare our attendees to identify the best data and methods to deal with future public health crises or natural disasters.

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